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Good Reads Choice Awards Winner 201
“An affecting and hope-filled posthumous collection of essays and stories from the talented young Yale graduate whose title essay captured the world’s attention in 2012 and turned her into an icon for her generation.” read more >

 

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2014 Must Reads: The 100+ Best Books of the Year
“Marina Keegan’s The Opposite of Loneliness: Essays and Stories is a posthumous collection written by a 2012 Yale student who had a play set to be produced and a job waiting at The New Yorker when she died tragically in a car crash days after graduation. Following the viral success of her final essay for the Yale Daily News, “The Opposite of Loneliness,” her essays and stories have been gathered into a collection.” read more >

 

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21 page-turning books that captivated readers in 2014
“This posthumous collection of writing from Marina Keegan, a promising young writer whose life was cut tragically short 5 days after her college graduation. “  read more >

 

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The 19 Best Nonfiction Books Of 2014
“Only 22 years old at the time of her tragic death, Marina Keegan was already a remarkably talented writer. The Opposite of Loneliness, her collected essays and fiction (sue me, I’m putting it on this list anyways), is insightful, self-aware, and full of all the hope and promise of youth. It will make you wish — for many reasons — that you could read more.” read more >

 

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Scribner Celebrates The Best Books of 2014
“As 2014 draws to a close, Scribner is honored to have so many of our books recognized and recommended.  Take a look at the Scribner titles included in “best of” lists of 2014. ” read more >

 

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Best of 2014: Books
This is a must-read for those who believe in the need for living each moment of their lives fully as if it is their last, for it may just be so. And as a bookish teenager recently suggested, “A better read for those still fawning over the pungent melodrama of The Fault in Our Stars.” read more >

 

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“We don’t have a word for the opposite of loneliness, but if we did, I could say that’s what I want in life,” wrote Marina Keegan. As a college senior, this is how she opened the final message to her classmates, distributed in a special edition of the Yale Daily News. “What we have to remember is that we can still do anything,” she continued. “We can change our minds.” read more>

 

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Leigh Haber writes, “Two years after a young writer’s death, her words soar. . . . The Opposite of Loneliness is a posthumous collection of her fiction and nonfiction pieces, and it sparkles with talent, humanity, and youth. The prose, polished but thoroughly unselfconscious, is heartbreaking evidence of what could have been.” read more>

 

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“How do you mourn the loss of a fiery talent that was barely a tendril before it was snuffed out? Answer: Read this book.” read more>
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“TWO years ago, Marina Keegan’s life brimmed with promise. She was graduating with high honors from Yale University, already a precocious writer about to take up a job at The New Yorker.” read more>
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“As a student, her urgent writing about her generation had already reached a wider audience. Her death, days after graduation, lends her words extra power…” read more>

 

“The writing Marina Keegan leaves behind offers a tantalizing taste of a literary voice still in development yet already imbued with unusual insight, nuance, humor, and sensitivity.” -Deborah Treisman, fiction editor, The New Yorker

“In her brief life Marina Keegan managed to achieve a precocious literary mastery. Her wry, wise, lyrical voice is unforgettable, and her vital, exuberant spirit reminds us powerfully to seize the day. Though every sentence throbs with what might have been, this remarkable collection is ultimately joyful and inspiring, because it represents the wonder that she was.” -J.R. Moehringer, Pulitzer Prize winner and New York Times bestselling author of The Tender Bar

“I will never cease mourning the loss of my beloved former student Marina Keegan. This book gives partial evidence of the extraordinary promise that departed with her. Throughout she manifests authentic dramatic invention and narrative skill. Beyond all those, she makes a vital appeal to everyone in her generation not to waste their gifts in mere professionalism but instead to invest their youthful pride and exuberance both in self-development and in the improvement of our tormented society.” -Harold Bloom, Sterling Professor of the Humanities and English, Yale University

“Many of my students sound forty years old. They are articulate but derivative, their own voices muffled by their desire to skip over their current age and experience, which they fear trivial, and land on some version of polished adulthood without passing Go. Marina was twenty-one and sounded twenty-one: a brainy twenty-one, a twenty-one who knew her way around the English language, a twenty-one who understood that there were few better subjects than being young and uncertain and starry-eyed and frustrated and hopeful. When she read her work aloud around our seminar table, it would make us snort with laughter, and then it would turn on a dime and break our hearts.” -Anne Fadiman, Yale University Professor of English and Francis Writer in Residence and author of The Spirit Catches You and You Fall Down and Ex Libris

“Illuminates the optimism and neurosis felt by new grads everywhere. . .Like every millenial who’s seen irony elevated to an art form, Keegan brings self-awareness to the collective insecurity of her peers even as she captures it with a precision that only comes from someone who feels it too. How unfortunate that she will never know the value readers will find in her work.” -Publishers Weekly

Download and read article published in COSMOPOLITAN MAGAZINE

“[Keegan’s short stories] are always thoughtful, intelligent, and surprising and reveal a writer eager to find her literary voice by taking risks with both form and content. At their best, they are ferociously insightful. . . . As humane as it is sympathetic, Keegan’s work is a poignantly inspiring reminder of what is possible in the pursuit of dreams.” –Kirkus

“Funny, poignant, tender, and fiercely alive, The Opposite of Loneliness contains the keen observations of a short lifetime—and the wisdom of a much longer one.” -Jennifer DuBois, author of Cartwheel and A Partial History of Lost Causes

Review quotes GOODREADS
“The book is… a powerful monument to a writer that is able to distill the essence of humanity onto paper… While Marina may be gone, we need to read and reread what she has written and take it to heart. Let it give us chills, fear, hope, anger…whatever emotion it brings to you, let it come.” -Andrew Shuping